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Bygones of Monroe:

MAY GOD GO WITH THEM.

Never but once before, and that a generation ago, has the April sun shone down upon a more enthusiastic and patriotic city than ours of last Tuesday. A generation ago ruffian's hands fired upon our country's flag floating to the southern breeze over Fort Sumter and a slumbering giant aroused from his sleep to avenge the insult and preserve the country. There was heard the fanfare of trumpets and the ratapan of the drums as the boys left for the front. Again has the flag of the country been insulted. A little over two months ago, in the hush and silence of the tropic night, with no voice to warn and no hand to stay, nearly three hundred Americans were treacherously done to death in Havana harbor and a battleship over which our flag was flying sank in the ooze and slime of the treacherous port; and again has the giant awakened from his slumbers. The circumstances which have called forth the unparalleled demonstration of patriotism which marked our city Tuesday are to well known to need repetition at this place. The feverish impatience with which the people have watched the dragging course of a diplomacy which proved to be fruitless; the debate, resolutions and final acts of congress; and the law authorizing the president to call for volunteers are all too recent to need repetition. With the passage of the appropriation bill at the special session of our own legislature, preparations for the inevitable began and since that time Company G has been waiting for the word. With the authorization to the president to call out the militia events began to move with the speed which characterizes the American nation.

Capt. John M. Gutmann received the following order by wire Friday afternoon.

DETROIT, April 22, 1896.

Capt. J. M. Gutmann:

Have your command ready to move in heavy marching order to Island Lake not later than Tuesday, April 26. Every available rifle, blanket and overcoat must be taken. Do not bring stoves or provisions except rations en route. The men will find use for private blankets for a few days. If short of overcoats, men not supplied may wear citizens' coats. Extra overcoats and blankets will be issued at camp. Route wired later by Q. M. General by command of Governor.

E. M. IRISH, Adj. General.

From the receipt of this message Capt. Gutmann and the other officers of the company have been the busiest men in the county. The ranks of the company were not full and a recruiting office was immediately opened to complete the number required by the Adj. General.

Tuesday morning dawned bright and beautiful, the harbinger of the coming spring. The business and residence streets were decorated with flags and bunting and old glory swung across Front, Monroe and Washington streets. Just before noon the crowds began to gather, and on the streets at noon a dense mass of humanity on foot, awheel and in carriages extended in ever direction from the Armory where the boys had assembled. At 12:10 with notes at first soft and low and then increasing in vigor the Monroe Cornet Band in front of the Armory thrilled the vast crowd with "Star Spangled Banner." At 12:15 the band formed in line preceded by the city police to clear a path through the mass of humanity and under the lead of drum major, George Diffenbaugh, who acted as marshal of the day, the procession started upon its way. Following the band came the common council of the city and the representatives of the press, then came the Knights of St. John, whose natty uniforms glittered in the noon tide sun; these were followed by the fire department of the city with machinery draped, festooned and covered in the American colors. Following these came a procession which inspired the enthusiasm of the mass of humanity through which they marched; the entire public schools of the city under charge of Supt. Rieman and their teachers, from the young men and women of the high school to the little tots of the infant class carrying an American flag. One could but think that the soldierly men of Company G., standing in parade rest while the procession moved by them, had some of them been the little boys of a generation ago when their fathers and brothers had gone, as they were going, to defend the flag they were carrying; and a momentary thought flashed through the mind, of the future, wondering in what high and holy cause these children might yet be called forth to defend the honor of the flag, love and reverence for which was thus being instilled into their young lives.

The next division was the G. A. R., those battered veterans who knew from personal experience in the years agone what war meant; those men who a generation ago heard the same call which has come to Company G and in the pride of their young manhood, went forth to battle for the flag. They were men of bent form and gray hair, but their bearing was that of men who knew and had done their duty nobly and well, and in their eyes still sparkled the old time fire, and we doubt not in their hearts they still wished to go.

As the last veteran marched by, Capt. Gutmann gave the command which set Company G in motion, "off for the war," and the march was begun. Afar up Washington street just turning on to Front could be heard the strains of the band playing

"Hurrah! hurrah! we bring the jubilee

Hurrah! hurrah! the flag that sets you free."

as our boys with soldierly bearing, arms at shoulder and firm step began the march which took them from home and kindred and friends to a future which at the very best must be uncertain. As the last member swung into line the veterans of the militia company of Monroe fell into line to act as an escort to their friends and successors.

The march through Washington and Front streets to the F. & P. M. depot and the scenes at the depot beggar description. Through a solid phalanx of humanity lining both sides of the road a mile and a half in length, into a solid phalanx of humanity gathered at the depot, marched the column which was followed by a large number of citizens in hacks, in carriages and on foot. The pent-up feeling broke forth in cheers along the line of march and the mass of humanity, men, women and children, surged along as the procession passed and followed it to the station. There the roof of the depot and every other surrounding edifice, the trees, telegraph poles, switch stands, water tank and bridge, and the top of every car in the vicinity, was packed with a surging mass of humanity. But a few moments were given for leave taking when the train drew into the station and the boys embarked. As the engine slowly forced its way through the crowd there was shaking of hands, waving of handkerchiefs and cheers of the assemblage the boys were off and the first act in the drama of the war had closed.

The following is the list of men of the company and new men enlisted, their ages and social condition.

Age S. C.

Capt. John M. Gutmann...42 M

1 st Lieut. Irv'g S. Harrington.40 "

2d " Fred W. Reisig....39 "

SERGEANTS.

1 st , Merrill E. Webb......35 "

2d, George J. Schmid...............35 "

3 rd , Otto E. Reisig......31 "

4 th , August C. Verhoven.....30 S

5 th , John M. Hoffman....23 M

CORPORALS.

Gustave Ferner........28 S

Wm. Luft...........29 "

Fred Schultz.........24 "

Alexander C. Rupp.......24 "

Frank Schreiber.......29 M

Gustave A. Rupp........27 S

Frederick C. Haag......26 "

PRIVATES.

Althoefer, Edward......18 S

Beck, John S.........19 "

Born, Fred.........23 "

Bruckner, Austin........26 "

Cron, Fred W.......21 "

Deinzer, Alex T......20 "

Duschane, Fred W.....22 "

Falk, Walter S. C.......18 "

Gutmann, Fred (Q. M.)....47 "

Graessle, Lawrence G......20 "

Heller, George........18 "

Koepke, Anthony......21 "

Kirchner, Jos. W........18 "

Kissweather, Michael......24 "

Louttit, Frank W........29 M

Luft, John J..........21 S

Miller, Ernest J.......22 "

Martin, Guy.........23 M

Miller, Eddie.......24 S

Meinicke, Hugo A.....24 "

Marx, Gustave........18 "

Nadeau, Dan........22 "

Nickels, Bert........23 "

Osgood, Mark L......31 "

Ohr, Otto...........26 "

Ott, Ernest.........21 "

Peles, Otto C........23 "

Pousha, Edward T......20 "

Quell, August T......23 "

Quell, Wm. L.......22 "

Root, Bert C.........20 "

Rabbit, Frank.......19 "

Sancraint, Charles......33 "

Sortor, Arthur.......27 M

Sackett, Charles A......20 S

Smith, Edward.........22 "

Schneider, Wm........26 "

Tisdale, Burton A.......22 "

Verhoven, Aloys........24 "

Witt, John W........26 M

Wagner, Arthur F.......21 S

Wright, Burton A.......19 "

Westgate, Vern.......19 "

Yance, John.........22 "

Zeller, Joseph.........29 "

Zarend, Conrad......20 "

RECRUITS.

Wm. Dusablon.......22 S

James A. Eisenman......23 "

George Armbruster......23 "

James D. Butler......21 "

Wm. A. Cron.......36 "

Walter D. Duclo........28 "

Alfred W. Duvall......21 "

Adam F. Cron........25 "

Wm. Nicholls.........25 M

Benjamin Albain.......19 S

Richard Vivian.......32 "

Irven A. Ploof.........19 S

Leonard Beyerlein.....21 "

Edward D. Cogswell....40 "

Fred G. Philips.......21 "

Lewis A. Kline.......23 "

Chas. H. Cady........19 "

John C. Rod.........23 "

James E. Navarre......44 "

John H. Duclo........32 "

Columbus J. Navarre....25 "

Roy Sortor........22 "

John J. Kiley.......25 "

I. T. Holland.......21 "

Isaac Godfroy........21 "

 

(The Monroe Democrat, front page, April 28, 1898.)



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